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Permits & Licenses

Do I need a City of Norco Business License?

If you are a business entity doing business within the City of Norco, then yes, you will need to have a valid City Business License. If you have specific questions concerning Business Licenses in the City of Norco, contact Business License at (951) 270-5679.


How long is a permit good for?

A building permit is valid for 180 days after it is issued. In addition, the Building Official may grant a onetime only 180-day extension.  Once a permit is expired, you may be required to begin the permit process from the beginning and pay all of the applicable fees again, so it is wise to avoid permit expiration.


What about Workers’ Compensation Insurance?

Contractors State license law requires that all California licensed contractors maintain Workers’ Compensation Insurance coverage if they have employees or a Certificate of Exemption from coverage certifying they have no employees. This information is available through the Contractors State License Board web site www.cslb.ca.gov.

 


What paperwork do I need as a Contractor to pull a permit?

As a California licensed contractor, you will need the following paperwork in order to pull a permit:

1. Your State Contractor’s License, generally the wallet card issued by the Contractors State License Board or other documentation that you are the licensee.

2. Be sure that you have a current City of Norco Business License (including all Sub Contractors).

3. If you are not the licensee listed on the contractor’s license, then you will need to have a letter, which lists you as being authorized to pull permits on behalf of the licensed contractor. This letter will need to be on company letterhead and presented to us at time of permit issuance.


What paperwork do I need as the property owner to pull a permit?

As the property owner, you do not need any paperwork other than proof of identification, typically a state photo ID such as a Driver’s License. If you have recently acquired the property and the Assessor’s database does not yet show you as the owner, then you will need to show evidence that you are the actual owner. In some cases the real estate transaction papers will confirm the ownership status. Other cases may require contacting a title company to confirm the ownership status. If you are not the property owner or a licensed contractor, then you will need to have a letter, which lists you as being authorized to pull the permit on behalf of the property owner.


What paperwork do I need if I am not the property owner or the licensed Contractor?

1. If you are a permit service then you will need a current City Business License and a notarized Owner Declaration form.

2. If you are not the property owner, then you will need to have an authorization letter signed by the owner, which lists you as being authorized to pull the permit on behalf of the property owner and an Owner Declaration.

3. If you are not the licensee listed on the contractor’s license, then you will need to have a letter, which list you as being authorized to pull permits on behalf of the licensed contractor. This letter will need to be on company letterhead and presented to us at time of permit issuance.  This letter is in addition to the other paperwork listed in the pervious question, "What paperwork do I need as a Contractor to pull a permit?"


Who can pull a permit?

Generally, only a California Licensed Contractor or the property owner can pull a permit. There are, however, a few exceptions to this basic rule. There are different categories of contractors, for example; General Building Contractors, Electrical Contractors, Plumbing Contractors, Re-roofing Contractors, and many others. By State law, these different types of contractors are limited as to the types of permits they can pull. For example, a Plumbing Contractor cannot pull an electrical permit, and visa versa. If the permit is to be pulled by someone other than the licensed contractor (the actual licensee listed on the contractor’s license) or the actual property owner (as listed in the Assessor’s database), then you will need to review the question, "What paperwork do I need if I am not the property owner or the licensed Contractor?"